The Basics of Google Authorship Markup

With another impending Google update seemingly just around the corner, Internet marketers worldwide are now scrambling to see if they can’t figure out what the “next big thing” in SEO will be. It seems to most web professionals that Google is working to maximize their own social media platform use by incorporating Google Authorship signals into its algorithm when determining search engine rankings. So, what does this mean for small businesses, bloggers and webbies alike? It means we better get familiar with Google Authorship, and we better get familiar with it now.

What is Google Authorship?

Google Authorship is basically Google’s way of making their social media platform more significant to search engine results than any other social platform. It’s also a way for Google to identify “authors” with authority. What Google Authorship does is identifies an actual human being associated with a page or blog post on a website. And since Google loves humans and users, of course this is going to quickly become a major factor in signaling a “good” page to Google. The fact is, if a real person is associated with a page in cyberspace, it’s likely to be more reliable than a page without the author linking, as those pages might as well be run by robots as far as the search engines are concerned.

So in a digital world of user-friendliness, it actually makes a lot of sense that Google’s next update would put a shift in focus much heavier on the actual users themselves. Visitors to websites want to see content and read words written by humans. Google Authorship is Google’s way of identifying those pages that comply with this idea.

How do you implement Google Authorship?

There are a few basic steps to follow to make sure you implement Google Authorship markup correctly. First, you need to decide where you’ll be implementing the authorship markup – will it go on a page of your website or on a post on your blog? Using Authorship markup on a blog is probably the easiest way to start, as it will identify the actual author of each and every blog post and put more trust in that post when it appears in search engines. Each author who writes for your blog should have their own Google+ account, complete with a photo of themselves that’s simple and professional (the photo itself will actually show up in search results if the markup is implemented correctly).

If you’re going to associate Authorship with a page of your website, you need to choose someone to be the “face” of your company, or choose a photo that reflects your brand. This person (don’t use a company page – I’ll explain why in a moment) should have a Google+ page that they are comfortable associating with your entire website.

The next step is to link the Google+ profile of your author to your actual blog or website. This part is easy – just log in to your Google+ account and click through to your “About” section. There should be a box labeled “Links” that gives you an opportunity to link to other profiles of yours, websites that you own or pages that you contribute to. Click “Edit” in this box.

You’ll want to focus on the “Contributor to” section of the next edit screen. If you’re an author for a blog, just enter the blog’s name and its URL path.

Save changes, and your Google+ profile is now linked to the blog for which you are an author.

Implementing Authorship Markup

The next step gets a big technical, and that’s why I thought it would be important to outline it in an easy way to understand. Now that your Google+ profile is connected to the site to which you are contributing, it’s time to add Authorship markup to the post itself that you’re linking your author profile to.

It’s easy on most blogs – all you have to do is include a link to your Google+ page at the end of your blog post. Here at Mountain Media, we like to add a little line at the bottom of each of our blog posts that simply says “Connect with [author name] on Google+!” Of course, you could get more creative or more in depth by adding links to your other social profiles (namely Facebook and Twitter), as well, but we like to keep things simple.

In order to add the Authorship markup to this statement, you need to switch to the HTML editor of your content management system for your blog and enter the following code:

Except instead of using the link that’s in this image, insert the link to your Google+ profile that’s connected to your blog. Change it to your name and you’re all set. This is called a <rel=”author”> tag, as it’s simply an HTML link that contains a tiny bit of additional markup to signify that the author of the post is also on Google+.

The Result

After you’ve linked your Google+ profile to the page you’re contributing to and you’ve implemented your rel=”author” tag, here’s what a standard search result for which your blog post is found will look like:

That’s considered a rich snippet search result, and it might soon become the most important type of rich snippet result you can implement yourself with the next Google algorithm update. It shows that I’m the author associated with that particular post, which signifies to Google that the post is trustworthy and truly written by a human.

Additional Things to Remember

While this is considered Authorship in its most standard and basic form, there’s a lot more to it than just linking your Google+ page to your blog or website. For starters, the more Author Rank you can build, the more trustworthy the posts with which you are associated will become. That means that if people +1 your posts, share your posts and interact with your Google+ page on a regular basis, your Author Rank will improve. Make sure you stay an active user on Google+ if you want to improve your Author Rank.

Additionally, Google doesn’t exactly allow you to link a brand to a blog post or web page as easily as they allow you to link a person. In order to link a business Google+ page to a post or page, you’ll have to implement a <rel=”publisher”> tag, which, at the moment, isn’t quite as powerful as a <rel=”author”> tag. Remember, Google likes people. So, if you wish to associate your brand page with your website, just remember to use <rel=”publisher”>, but for a more powerful “human” link, try to choose an individual person to represent your company that will link their own personal page to your blog or website.

If you’re implementing <rel=”author”> on a blog, make sure each author, or contributor, to the blog has their own author page. With WordPress blogs, this is easily accomplished and simply requires each author to have their own unique login information to the blog. That way, when each author’s posts appear on the blog, if you click on their name in the byline, you’re directed to a page of posts authored by that contributor only. This helps Google distinguish between authors on your blog and helps strengthen the link between your authors’ Google+ pages and your blog.

So fear not the impending Google algorithm change! Just be sure to be aware of and familiar with Google Authorship, what it means and what it does. We’re still conducting research into the topic here at Mountain Media, and we have to say, the best way to learn something new such as this is to just try it. See how it works. Then research a bit more and tweak your approach from there.

This should help you get started using Google Authorship linking and markup, so pick a page on your website or a post on your blog and get started experimenting before the next Google algorithm hits!

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PR & SEO: A Match Made In Cyber Heaven

MarriageAs of late, SEOs have pointed out the benefits of working with public relations (PR) professionals. More specifically, Ken McGaffin of Search Engine Watch pointed out ten reasons why PR should be on your radar in 2013. As Ken mentions, the latest Google Panda and Penguin updates have put an emphasis on high quality websites that include unique content and powerful backlinks, as well as how partnering with PR is a great business tactic.

I can empathize with the groans of frustration from SEOs around the world. Why would Google do this to us?? The answer is simple: Search engines want to provide the best user experience possible, period. Therefore, sites that offer little value to users or include duplicate content from other websites are going to drop significantly in rankings (as we’ve already seen). Contrarily, high-quality websites that offer original content and useful information to users will see a spike in search engine rankings.

The Power Couple

While many SEOs rack their brains as to how they can overcome Google’s latest changes, the easiest and most beneficial option for everyone would be to develop content that is both human and search engine friendly…hence the collaboration with PR. Many of you are probably thinking how can SEO benefit from PR? Or, you may have a negative perception of PR altogether. For instance, PR practitioners are all liars and spin-doctors (thanks a lot Edward Bernays). However, with a background in PR, I am here to put your fears to rest and tell you that is not the case. PR practitioners are actually skilled storytellers and content generators. And their primary function is to build mutually beneficial relationships.

SEOs on the other hand, have a strong background in coding, keyword research and link building. For the most part, their efforts are done behind the scenes, which can make them, how do I put this nicely? Not the most engaging copywriters. Hey, I’ve been on both ends of the spectrum! But together, PR and SEO make quite the power couple.

Call to Action

The Panda/Penguin updates call for unique content that is linked to by quality sites. Therefore, there is a strong need for quality content that can interest new viewers. There is also a need for authentic and engaging social media posts. In addition, press releases can attract the attention of authoritative websites through blogger outreach and media relations. SEOs must also learn how to build relationships rather than links. By combining the skills of PR and SEO, we can produce engaging, keyword friendly web content and powerful backlinks, ultimately creating high-quality websites.

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Search Marketing Space Will Be Healthy for a Long Time

Recession or not, the outlook for search marketing spending — both SEO and paid search advertising — is solid.

Spending on SEO will increase more than 110% by 2013 to $3.85 billion, according to eMarketer. Paid search advertising spending will increase 65% to $14.72 billion.

That level of additional spending portends enormous opportunities for every category of participant in the search ecosystem.

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